August 11, 2018

Gates Open 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

The inaugural Concours d'Elegance at Copshaholm will celebrate the history and evolution of automotive design. Vehicles from ten classes will be displayed on the breathtaking grounds of the historic Oliver mansion: Copshaholm. 

Chief Judge

Chief Judge Matt Short believes the automobile is “the greatest piece of art ever placed on 4 wheels” and is one of the nation’s foremost automotive historians  His professional experience includes The Henry Ford, The R.E. Olds Museum, The Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum, and America's Packard Museum.  Matt currently serves on the board of the Society of Automotive Historians and has previously served on the boards of the National Association of Automobile Museums and Packard Motor Car Foundation. A  frequent judge at Concours d’Elegance events from coast to coast, Matt’s passion is pre-World War II Full Classic® automobiles.  He is particularly drawn to large, complicated vehicles that were expensive when new and is the proud owner of an  all-original 1937 Rolls Royce 25/30 with a Windovers saloon body.

Master of Ceremonies

The Concours at Copshaholm’s Master of Ceremonies Bill Rothermel has had a lifelong interest in cars, both small and large. As an automotive historian and avid collector of miniature automobiles and automobilia, Bill’s interests include the Brass and Classic Eras, muscle cars, European sports cars, and postwar American cars.   He currently serves as the Master of Ceremonies of the Boca Raton Concours d’Elegance, Boca Raton, Florida; The Elegance, Hershey, Pennsylvania; the Concours of America, St. Johns, Michigan; the Radnor Concours d’Elegance, Malvern, Pennsylvania; the St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance, St. Michaels, Maryland; The Hemmings Concours, Lake George, New York.  As a freelance writer, Bill’s work has been featured in national, international, club and concours publications such as Automobile Quarterly, The Flying Lady, Old Cars Weekly, and Sports Car Market, among others. 


Never leave well enough alone.
— Raymond Loewy